Update re: Cite your sources, Grub Street!

An editor at Grub Street reached out to clarify the situation. Apparently the similarity between my piece and their piece was complete coincidence – Grubhub Seamless gave Clint the same data that they gave me, and he picked out the same interesting morsels. Fair enough.

However, Casey’s piece in the New Yorker needed to be credited, so the change was made in Grub Street’s article.

All wrongs have been righted!

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Cite your sources, Grubstreet!

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Writer Clint Rainey put out a piece today in NYMag’s Grub Street blog titled, “How Much Should You Really Tip Your Food Delivery Guy When the Weather Sucks?” Sound familiar?

What’s particularly disheartening about his article are two very familiar points which he likely grabbed from my article in the Village Voice Fork in the Road food blog and Casey N. Cep’s piece in The New Yorker’s blog.

1. I wrote, “…while tips did increase in New York City, they only went up 5 percent, putting New York dead last in cold-induced generosity on a list of 11 cities affected by the Polar Vortex. In the Midwest, tipping increased significantly. In Detroit and Minneapolis, tipping was more than 15 percent higher than average, and in Chicago, it was more than 14 percent higher.”

Rainey writes, “New York’s overall hike was a pretty modest 5 percent, but harder-hit areas saw more considerable jumps as the polar vortex descended: Gratuities rose 15 percent in Detroit and Minneapolis, and nearly as much in Chicago, which saw a 14 percent tip bump.”

That’s awfully similar, don’t you think?

2. Cep wrote, “GrubHub Seamless compared tipping (by credit card on Seamless and GrubHub, and using PayPal on GrubHub) during the recent polar vortex to other weekdays since December 1st. The 10037 Zip Code—a corner of East Harlem—saw the greatest increase in tipping: twenty-four per cent on January 7th, when the day’s low hit a frigid four degrees.”

Rainey writes, “According to GrubHub Seamless’s New York data, online tips (those paid by credit card and PayPal at the time of ordering) on January 7 — when the polar vortex arrived and the overnight low was 4 degrees — were above average in every NYC zip code that got a delivery except for small pockets of Queens and Brooklyn. The best of the best was 10037, a triangle in Harlem off the Harlem River, where tips bumped up an impressive 24 percent.

I mean that’s just straight plagiarism.

Listen Clint, I’m all for recycling good ideas, but at least cite your sources. Thanks!