Whole Foods 365 Opened in Downtown Brooklyn And It’s Actually Cheaper Than You Think

There are few things I love in this world more than a good supermarket. One of my favorite ways to de-stress after a hectic day is to stroll through the neatly stacked displays, alone and anonymous, feeling thankful to be present in this moment in culinary history. Five kinds of extra sharp cheddar, pre-spiralized butternut squash noodles, Root Beer Float flavored Chips Ahoy – what a time to be alive!

In this blog, I’ve previously written impassioned announcements of the arrival of Trader Joe’s and Wegmans outposts in New York City locations:

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Actual photo of me excited about Wegmans

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Non actual photo of me excited about Trader Joe’s

Adding to my collection of real and poorly edited images with markets, join me in triumphantly welcoming Whole Foods 365 to Downtown Brooklyn!

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Whole Foods 365 opened this past Wednesday in the bottom floor of 300 Ashland, one of the myriad of luxury high-rises in the area. The budget-friendly store is a smaller version of its big brother, Whole Paycheck. But is it actually easier on your wallet?

I compared the prices of staple items here to my normal grocery store, the Stop and Shop at Atlantic Terminal, five minutes away from 365. Much to my surprise, 365 is beating Stop and Shop in pricing for nearly every item. See below for a detailed breakdown:

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In addition to being cheaper, 365 is downright classy. Here’s a photo tour of the new digs:

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The store has a lot of Fort Greene signage, despite arguably being located in Downtown Brooklyn

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The upstairs section has several fast casual food stalls and this tablet-heavy self-serve alcohol situation

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Don’t forget about Amazon!

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Descending into market madness

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One of the workers I spoke with said the avocados were the best deal in the store. Can’t argue.

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SEND PRE-SPIRALIZED NOODZ

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Lest you think you’ll only find kale and quinoa, behold a mighty impressive selection of tall boys.

Saige C., who lives in East Flatbush but works in the area, struck up a conversation as I devoured a quick dinner from the hot bar.  When I asked her how she felt about the store, her feelings were mixed.

“I’m proud of the jobs the new store is creating,” said Saige, “but I think their use of Fort Greene all around the store is unnecessary. We’re in Downtown Brooklyn, which is already pretty gentrified. They should stop trying to make Fort Greene part of their brand.”

But if your sustainable seafood doesn’t come from a neighborhood with tree-lined, brownstone speckled streets, is it even worth buying?

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